A certificate of origin is a document attesting to the country of origin of the goods. A certificate of origin may be required by the customs authority of the country into which the goods are imported. It is also used frequently to determine how much customs the importer will pay to bring back the goods. FTA certificates or declarations should only be issued if your property is qualified for ESTV. Not all FTA agreements require specific forms. There is a special NAFTA certificate (CBP 434) for qualified shipments to Canada and Mexico. Many other FTA partners may accept declarative statements containing certain data elements, including information about how the product qualifies for an FTA. However, importers may continue to require exporters to use a particular format. 12. Where a Party carries out an origin check including a value test, a de minimis calculation or another provision of the Third Chapter (Rules of Origin) for which generally accepted accounting principles may be relevant, it shall apply the principles applicable in the territory of the other Party. Free trade agreements (FTAs) between the United States and other countries use a certificate of origin to document: that, under the terms of the free trade agreement, goods on the form may receive special customs treatment. The Colombian Trade Agreement (COTPA) entered into force on 15 May 2012.

Most Colombian products currently arrive in the U.S. duty-free and without a Freight Processing Fee (MPF), and virtually all will arrive in the U.S. free of charge when COTPA is fully implemented in 2028. Information on U.S. exporters is available from the Department of Commerce at 2016.export.gov/FTA/index.asp 3. If a Contracting Party requests importers, exporters and producers in its territory to keep documents or records on the origin of a thing, in accordance with the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of that Party, it shall allow them to do so in any medium, provided that the documents or records can be consulted and printed. 2. The Parties shall cooperate to ensure the explicit and efficient availability of the goods. To that end, Contracting Parties should take into account all certificates issued by the exporting Party with respect to trade in the supply chain. 15.

It is the responsibility of the Chilean importer to receive preferential treatment for a given lot at the time of customs clearance of the goods. (Under the U.S.-Chile Free Trade Agreement, the ultimate responsibility for the validity of the claim rests with the importer and not the exporter, as is the case with NAFTA.) To claim the preferential rate of duty, the importer must submit to Chilean Customs a written declaration which may or may not take the form of a certificate of origin. . . .